Meet Jeanette Watts in Our Third Author Q&A

Welcome to Em T. Wytte’s Third Author Q&A, featuring the fabulous Jeanette Watts! I say fabulous because anyone who can manage to work, sew, run 5 dance groups, and write multiple books is pretty amazing.

But as Levar Burton would say, “You don’t have to take my word for it.”

An Interview with Author Jeanette Watts

Meet Jeanette Watts in Our Third Author Q&A


 1. What was your first finished book?

Wealth and Privilege

2. How many books did you start or work on before finishing that book?

I wrote countless fan fiction books when I was a kid – I don’t think there WAS such a thing as fan fiction in those days! But my friends and I loved Star Wars, and I had my own characters, and told stories to my friends in installments.

3. If it wasn’t the first book you worked on, what made this book different? What made you finish this one?

Love. I love these characters! Thomas is a decent man surrounded by flawed and selfish people. He’s flawed, but lovable. And he loves Regina the way I think every woman wants to be loved: wholeheartedly.

4. What was the biggest challenge you encountered when finishing your first book?

Finding an agent! I spent five years looking for an agent, before my friends finally convinced me to publish straight to Kindle. I should have listened to them a year earlier than I did. Agents are crazy. They ask you to rewrite your book to their specifications, and then they don’t like your book anymore…

5. If you’ve written books since then, was writing them easier/harder? How was the experience different?

I’d heard that “the first book is the hardest.” It’s true. Somehow, once you’ve completely written one, something changes in your brain, and you know HOW to complete other books. My first book took 10 years to write. When my readers insisted I write a sequel, it took maybe two years.

6. Have you published your book? If yes, what medium(s) did you publish it in and why?

I started on Kindle, and then I had people clamoring for a hard copy. I published through CreateSpace, and Smashwords, and now I have people asking when the audiobook is coming out. Demand is a good thing.

7. Who did your cover art? What was that experience like?

The words “cover art” always make me laugh. When I published on Kindle, I had followed the instructions, proudly hit the button, and it said “congratulations, your book is on Kindle! Now upload your cover art.” I stared blankly at the screen and said, “Oh. Yeah, I guess I should have seen that coming…” I am a Vintage dancer, all I had to do was sort through 3 years of vacation photos and I had several options I could use. My husband is a marvelous graphic artist, he chose a photo, tinkered with it, and I’ve had people tell me I obviously spent a fortune on my cover art.

The story doesn’t end there… once I published hard copies, I uploaded my novel, proudly uploaded my cover art saying “Ha! I’ve got this.” Then I was asked to upload the BACK cover art. I slapped myself on the forehead and said, “Wow. I REALLY should have seen that one coming.” I told my husband I need a back cover, without missing a beat he told me I needed a photo of a woman’s gloved hand on the chest of a man in a tailcoat. Which is exactly what’s on the back cover of my book…

8. How are you marketing your book(s)?

In the most haphazard manner possible. I love getting to book fairs as much as possible, and I should really do more of them! I’ve done virtual book tours, book signings at independent bookstores, done podcast interviews, and bought various packages through AmericaStar.

9. What is your next step?

Finishing my next book, so that I can get on with writing the one after that! Just one more round of proofreading, and Jane Austen Lied to Me is ready to be released. I took a mental vacation from historic fiction and wrote a contemporary satire. I thought that would be “easier,” not having to do all the historical research. I was wrong.

10. What is your favorite part of writing?

Writing just feels good. Getting the words out of my head, and onto paper (well, computer screen…). Having the characters blossom under your fingertips. You start with an idea, and it grows into something more powerful than you. Your characters take on a life of their own, and even when you have a preconceived notion of where things are going to go, when you’ve done it right, the characters stop doing what they’re told – they tell YOU what is going to happen, what they are going to do.

11. What is your biggest struggle with writing?

Keeping all the distractions away! I am also a dance instructor, and I have started five dance groups at the same time I’ve been writing, publishing, and promoting books. The writing will get set aside for a cancan dancer who needs a new costume. Or a dancer who needs some emotional support because of family drama, and instead of an evening of writing, I’m out being a girlfriend and there’s alcohol or chocolate involved. Then I step on the scale, groan, and I have to spend more time in the gym or out on a bicycle, working off the extra calories from the night out.

12. What do you consider your weakest writing skill and what have you done to strengthen it or make up for it?

Well, I have a weakness for ambiguous endings… I got in trouble with that with my readers. So Brains and Beauty has a more traditional, wrap-up-all-the-loose-threads-they-lived-happily-ever-after ending. I don’t like it as well, but it made people happy, and they forgave me for the first one. Except of course the people who thought the first one was perfect the way it was, and now they’re disappointed in me! So I think the moral of the story is, “Never forget that you can’t make everyone happy.”

13. Do you now or have you ever done writing prompts? Did they help?

Nope, and nope. I’m having trouble keeping up with my brain, which has all these stories in there, and I don’t write fast enough to suit it. I don’t need a prompt to give me something to write about. I would just like to be able to catch up to everything I want to write!

14. Have you take any writing classes? Which ones? What was your biggest take-away?

I am an English major, so I had quite a few writing classes. Two professors left an indelible impression on me, and my writing. One used to hand out writing assignments, and then he’d say, “Just be brilliant!” And I’ll be damned if I wasn’t. He told me “if you treat people like idiots, they will perform like idiots. If you treat them like geniuses, they will perform like geniuses.” I have lived by his philosophy ever since. The second professor taught me how to ignore that evil censor monkey that sits in our brains, forcing us to rewrite every sentence as soon as we’ve written it. His technique was to spit out the words, all of them, and then go back later and edit. It’s always easier to edit words that are already on the page than it is to find the right words in the first place.

15. What is your writing background?

As I mentioned, one of my bachelor’s degrees is in English. I double-majored with Cinema-Television; I thought I wanted to write soap operas for a living when I grew up. Never got to the soap operas, but I’ve worked in marketing departments and for marketing firms, I’ve written television commercials, screenplays, one-act stage plays for a festival with a wild west theme, a textbook on waltzing, and skits for a local history museum.

16. Have you ever written in a writing circle? What did you think?

I tried that once. You were supposed to pay $20 a visit, and bring ONE page in for everyone to critique. Besides being expensive when we’re talking about a 400 page book, people were “critiquing” minutiae, because you can’t get much character development in one page.

Since then, I’ve developed a large stable of proofreader/editors. I give out rough drafts of the entire manuscript when I think it’s “done” enough, and then I get 10-12 insightful read-throughs who give me wonderful feedback!

17. When and where do you write?

I love to write in pretty places. I have gotten so much done in hotel lobbies while my husband was at a conference. Friends of mine have a cabin in Canada that is the BEST place to hide and write, with Lake Erie in front of me. One time I took a few days before a dance weekend and hid out in a cabin in the Allegheny National Forest. Creek burbling away to my right, a giant hill covered in trees to my left. Found a really, really good winery on that trip when I stopped to take a break for a while…

18. Who are your favorite authors?

Margaret Mitchell and Louisa May Alcott

19. What is the #1 advice you would give to people who want to be writers?

Just do it. Stop making excuses. You are going to have to make it a priority – but think about it. What’s more important, getting the laundry done, or getting some writing done?


What do you think? Did you learn something?

Personally, I’ve gotta say that I am loving the author Q&A series so far – seeing the overlap in our feelings toward writing, learning about our differences and their causes, and, best of all, getting to know so many creative people better!

The authors’ candor and humor are what make these interviews both fascinating and useful. So a big thanks to Jeanette for being this month’s author!

Want to be the August author? Fill out the author Q&A form!

Jennifer Rainey: Author Q&A Number 2

Welcome to author Q&A number 2! This month’s author is Jennifer Rainey. I’ve known her for quite a while – well, “known” may be a little strong.

As musicians in different bands, we have crossed paths a number of times over the years (In fact, I remember when her first book was published). That said, we were both generally working when we saw each other, so we don’t know each other that well. I did, however, know that she’s been writing and publishing for quite a while, so she’s one of the first people I thought to invite to do an author Q&A.

An Author Q&A with Jennifer Rainey

Before we get to the author Q&A, let me say that reading her answers was a real treat – 1. because I learned more about someone I honestly should know better, and 2. because they’re interesting to read for any author!

IMHO, of course. But I think you’ll agree.

To start, they’re detailed and have a lot of valuable information for other writers , which is one of the main goals of the Q&A (so yay!). Even beyond that, though, they have a tone and style that pulls you in and makes you curious to read more.

Read for yourself and see what you think!

jennifer rainey author q & a number 2


1. What was your first finished book?

These Hellish Happenings (though it’s out of print)–Thoroughly Modern Monsters is my earliest work in print.

2. How many books did you start or work on before finishing that book?

Only a handful! I started pretty young. I wrote the first draft of These Hellish Happenings at 18 and published it independently at 21.

3. If it wasn’t the first book you worked on, what made this book different? What made you finish this one?

I am all about characters. I love to see what makes them tick, and I was so very fond of the cast of characters in These Hellish Happenings. They are really what drove me to finish it.

4. What was the biggest challenge you encountered when finishing your first book?

Sticking to a writing schedule!! I didn’t have any discipline. That’s something that I’ve really had to develop over the years.

5. If you’ve written books since then, was writing them easier/harder? How was the experience different?

WAY easier! It gets easier every time. For example, where These Hellish Happenings took three years from start to finish, my latest book, The Last Temptations of Iago Wick, was 13 months from start to finish. Just like anything else, writing and publishing take practice, and you’ll see yourself improve with each book.

6. Have you published your book? If yes, what medium(s) did you publish it in and why?

I publish independently because I love having that control. Everything is in my control: cover, title, sales channels. Having that freedom is really valuable to me.

I publish exclusively through Amazon because I really value the promotional options you have with them. And I think both electronic and physical books have their merits AND their fans. Ebooks are great and convenient and you can take a ton of them with you, but there’s something really great about that physical book, too. I think it’s important to appeal to both audiences there.

7. Who did your cover art? What was that experience like?

Jennifer Rainey Q & AMe! I have some background in graphic design–I’m a marketer in my day job–so that’s a place where I’ve always been able to save some money. Corel Paint Shop Pro is my go-to program. I can’t recommend it enough as an inexpensive alternative to Adobe Photoshop.

8. How are you marketing your book(s)?

Free and bargain book mailing lists, Twitter, Facebook, networking with other folks in the paranormal fantasy genres, talking to anyone who will listen–and writing more books! We’ve all heard it a thousand times, but it’s a marathon, not a sprint.

9. What is your next step?

I just published The Last Temptations of Iago Wick in February. That’s the first in The Lovelace & Wick Series, which is a paranormal/steampunk series based in 19th century Massachusetts. I’m working on a novella for publication this summer–Iago Wick and the Vampire Queen. Also, I’m hard at work on Binding Dante Lovelace, the second book in the series.

10. What is your favorite part of writing?

When it CLICKS. It’s worth it for when those characters really come to life and the story finally comes together. It’s worth it for that final product. You truly want to rip your hair out during the writing and editing process, but it’s so worth it in the end.

11. What is your biggest struggle with writing?

I STILL struggle with making time to write sometimes. After a long day at work, you don’t always want to edit or write, but you just have to make yourself do it.

12. What do you consider your weakest writing skill and what have you done to strengthen it or make up for it?

I like things like dialogue and allegories and pretty descriptions of setting more than plot sometimes. I’ve really had to step up my plot game! I’ve started asking myself in a scene, “This is a little flat–what would TOTALLY turn it on its ear?” Then, I do that and see how it goes. Definitely ramps up the action and keeps that plot interesting!

13. Do you now or have you ever done writing prompts? Did they help?

I don’t often. They just make me want to get back to my main WIP!

14. Have you take any writing classes? Which ones? What was your biggest take-away?

I haven’t. I took a lot of English lit in college (I majored in it), but no creative writing.

15. What is your writing background? (Do you have a degree in writing, worked in writing jobs, etc.)

I majored in English at Ohio State, but I’ve been writing and telling stories my whole life. I wrote in high school, in college, and I’ve always read A LOT. Now, I’m in bank marketing and that frequently involves writing (ad copy, newsletters, etc.). I am almost always writing in one way or another!

16. Have you ever written in a writing circle? What did you think? (Why do you or why don’t you?)

A few in college. They’re both great and dangerous. Don’t listen TOO much to the opinions of others. Take away what you will, but don’t let others shape the way you write more than is helpful–especially if they are not fans of your genre.

17. Who are your favorite authors?

Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett, Jonathan L. Howard, H.P. Lovecraft, Edgar Allan Poe, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Shakespeare… the list goes on.

18. What is the #1 advice you would give to people who want to be writers?

WRITE. If you want to write, do it. Don’t let anything get in the way. So many people WANT to write, but they don’t because they let other things get in the way. If you want to do it, do it. Make the time.

19. When and where do you write?

I mostly write in the morning. I get up at about 5:00 AM every day! Frequently, I’m either at my desk in my bedroom or sitting on the couch in my living room, but I also love visiting the library (support your public library!).


Now, that’s dedication! I used to manage 5 AM or earlier, but I’m afraid it is not in the cards for me at the moment. So props to Jennifer for doing it every day!

Come to mention it, let’s have a round of applause and a big thanks to Jennifer Rainey for filling out the author Q&A form! Weren’t her answers fun? I hope you enjoyed them as much as I did.

If anyone has anything they’d like to add to her answers or any questions, comment away. I look forward to hearing from you!

The First Author Q&A: Deirdre Simmons-Corbett

first author Q&A Deirdre Simmons-Corbett

More at 11…

Welcome to the first author Q&A! Our first author is Deirdre Simmons-Corbett, whom I met by chance through one of my other jobs. Of the 20 questions focused on the writing, publishing, and marketing process, Deirdre answered all that applied to her. And other than a grammar fix or two, the words are hers. I hope you find it useful or interesting at the very least!

Read on to get a different perspective on writing, publishing, marketing, and more!

17 Questions with Deirdra Simmons-Corbett

 1. What was your first finished book?

Tomorrow’s Another Day

2. How many books did you start or work on before finishing that book?

This is the first novel that I began and completed.

3. What was the biggest challenge you encountered when finishing your first book?

My biggest challenge was time management. Trying to juggle my full time job, family life and meeting deadlines for the book.

4. If you’ve written books since then, was writing them easier/harder? How was the experience different?

I have begun the sequel of Tomorrow’s Another Day which will be entitled Yesterday Is Gone. It is easier this time around as I am mindful not to make the same mistakes I did when writing and publishing my first novel.

5. Have you published your book? If yes, what medium(s) did you publish it in and why?

Yes, the book was self published.

6. Who did your cover art? What was that experience like?

I reached out to an experienced Cover designer. We discussed the book synopsis and what I would like the cover to look like. After a couple rough drafts, he produced the finish product.

7. How are you marketing your book(s)?

Social media, Sphere of influence, Book signings, Book fairs, Book clubs and book soirees.

8. What is your next step?

Completing the sequel.

9. What is your favorite part of writing?

The expression of words with a pen!!

10. What is your biggest struggle with writing?

Staying the same tense – past/present, etc.

11. Do you now or have you ever done writing prompts? Did they help?

I have not.

12. Have you take any writing classes? Which ones? What was your biggest take-away?

I was enrolled in writing classes while in college many years ago.

13. What is your writing background? (Do you have a degree in writing, worked in writing jobs, etc.)

I do not have a writing background. Writing and publishing a novel has been a passion of mine for some time.

14. Have you ever written in a writing circle? What did you think? (Why do you or why don’t you?)

I have not.

15. Who are your favorite authors?

Nathan McCall and Joy Lynn Ross

16. What is the #1 advice you would give to people who want to be writers?

Connect with an editor you trust, share your ideas and he or she will assist in elevating you to the next level until you become a published author!!

17. When and where do you write?

I write in my home office the majority of the time. However, in the middle of the night ideas come to me of which I write down – I keep a pen and pad next to me on my nightstand!!

Well, that’s all for this round. I hope you enjoyed the first author Q&A and that you got some new ideas or felt reassured by what you read.

Thanks to Deirdre for participating and stay tuned for the next author Q&A coming up later in June!

Henry David Thoreau Quote: The Key to Selling Anything

Henry David Thoreau Quote I have great faith in a seed... Convince me that you have a seed there, and I am prepared to expect wonders“I have great faith in a seed… Convince me that you have a seed there, and I am prepared to expect wonders.” Wow. To me, this Henry David Thoreau quote summarizes the main idea of selling your work to a publisher or a producer.* Heck, it’s the key to selling anything. And the two key words?

“Convince me.”

The Seed & the Idea

The seed is important. Never doubt that because it’s absolutely true. The promise of the seed, the map of it – because that’s what a seed is, right? – that is what you’re selling when you’re selling an idea. You’re telling them that you have a plan.

Because a seed is more than an idea. And this is where the makeup of an actual seed becomes useful in this metaphor. Seeds hold DNA for a plant, right? The blueprints for how the plant will work and what it will be. That’s the idea part. But there’s also energy. There’s food for that idea. Enough to feed it until it can begin to feed itself. Enough to get it started, to get that energy going.

Those are the elements of an idea that you need in order to sell it. No only the idea but also how it’s going to grow. And what’s going to help it grow.

Convincing (Persuasion)

That’s the other half of the equation, and unfortunately, it’s not always as simple as half. A really charismatic salesperson who’s good with all 3 appeals can convince you that a pretty bad idea has potential. On the other hand, if a person has a really fantastic idea, that person could be a worse salesperson (not horrible, but worse).

Unfortunately, the ability to convince and the willingness of the audience to be convinced can be much more important than the idea itself. In other words, if you already want to believe in the idea, then, it doesn’t even have to be that good of a salesperson. And if you’re naturally inclined against the idea, the salesperson had better be outstanding. (But I stray…).

That’s why the plan and energy of the idea are so important. You might even call them the key to selling anything.

If you convince someone that your idea has the energy to start and grow to be self-sustaining, then you’ve convinced them that the idea has potential. That’s when the value of the idea itself matters. It doesn’t matter how good the idea is if they don’t think it’ll go anywhere (or anywhere they want to go).

So what’s holding you back? Take your idea and flesh it out with the energy and the plan for making it take off!

*I haven’t even tried to sell a book or play yet, but I have worked in several sales jobs, including direct marketing and realty.

For Authors with Books in Kindle and Print: Check out the Storyteller UK Competition

Unfortunately, I’m not ready to take advantage of this opportunity. I am, however, prepared to share it so that you can. You’re welcome.

Sorry. Just kidding – I can’t say that seriously in those circumstances without feeling like the R-rated word for jerk.

Shizzle, Inc is now back to $2.99USD, and it’s the Storyteller UK competition to blame. That, and partly the negative reviews that come from readers grabbing a freebie without even reading the blurb. Oh, and the fact that in June I’m going to pitch it to a dozen publishers and a $2.99 book may look […]

via Storyteller UK competition and why Shizzle, Inc is no longer free — Ana Spoke, author

Literary Speed Sales to Publishers

No, I’ve never heard of this before. I’ve read about similar options for photographers in paid classes at some conferences (which, honestly, sounded very intense). But has anyone heard about literary speed sales to publishers here in the U.S.?

Friends share with friends, right? (And save them extra Googling when possible)

Did you know such thing even existed? No, it’s not authors dating authors, although maybe that’s not a bad idea either. It’s an event organised by an author society, where about a dozen publishers get to hear 3-minute pitches from writers that want to traditionally publish their books. I’ve known about the one organised by Australian […]

via Literary Speed Dating — Ana Spoke, author

Is There an Author Who’s Submitted to a Publisher & Never Received a Single Rejection Letter?

I am seriously curious. Does anyone know if there is an author who’s submitted to a publisher and never – I mean NEVER – received a single rejection letter? I think if I submitted something and got accepted the first try I’d be tempted never to try again just to be able to say that (tempted only. I couldn’t resist writing and trying again!).

Many of the most famous writers received rejection letters before finally being published. There are any number of great quotes by them on the matter, too. Some of the best writing advice out there is to write and submit over and over and over again until you get something published. And then, start all over.

Here’s an interesting example:

J.K. Rowling, famed author of the Harry Potter series, not only received rejection letters for that aforementioned series (I bet those publishers regret that now) but also received rejections letters for the unrelated series she’s written since then. We know this because Rowling posted two of the rejection letters on her twitter feed to show her fans that a rejection letter is not the end of the world. Or the end of a writing career for that matter.

Personally, I feel a little sorry for the publishers who didn’t know they were turning down such a famous author (their names were hidden, so it’s ok.), but I can also understand why she would want to try to publish the new series without resting on her laurels. It’s kind of like being an actor or actress who did so fabulously and famously in a specific role that your chance of getting a different kind of role is almost impossible. Or, it could make you wonder if you’re getting the new role because you deserved it or simply because the producers thought your name would sell in the box office.

I’m actually the most curious about how different the Harry Potter series was when it was accepted versus when it was rejected. Did she change it, or did she submit the same manuscript elsewhere?

See, like those producers, publishers are also thinking of salability, and if there’s a glutton of a certain type of novel on the market, then, maybe, book A will be chosen over book B. On the other hand, if there aren’t so many books competing, maybe, both would be published (Or that’s my impression from what publishers and authors say on the subject).

So if the timing is such a big part of getting published, are rejection letters a kind of notice that the time isn’t right yet? And submitting again and again to different publishers is like knocking on someone’s door – are you ready yet? You don’t want to be too obnoxious, but checking in every so often makes sense.

That’s not to say that all manuscripts that are submitted are going to be published if they’re submitted over and over again without any changes. Some novels do need revisions. That said, there are also plenty of novels that were rejected by multiple publishers before being picked up and hitting it big. And plenty of novelists whose works were rejected after they had big hits. No one is immune (Seriously, can you think of anyone?), so think of rejection letters as part of the publishing process.

C’mon, guys. Everybody’s doing it.

Traditional Publishing vs. Indie Publishing: How Should I Sell My Book?

Traditional publishing vs. indie publishing is another “why are you asking me?” question. It’s also a question you’re going to have to answer for yourself; however, I can give you some information that may help inform your decision.

Answering this question generally comes down to a combination of 4 factors: prestige, control, money, and time/energy (they’re the same factor in this case – we’ll get to that).

Prestige

It used to be that self-publishing was a career-breaker for writers. Not only was it really hard to make a profit (most self-publishing companies were too expensive for that), but also once  you did it, you’d effectively have marked yourself with a scarlet letter so that regular publishers wouldn’t want you anymore (not without major incentives).

Well, ebook sales have completely changed that. Writers can now sell their books with little-to-no upfront costs, and any residual negative connotations with self-publishing are rapidly disappearing.

The prestige of going through a publisher, on the other hand, is not fading quite as quickly. In many circles, there is still thrill and acclaim associated with being picked up by a publisher. It’s like a stamp of approval saying that your book made the cut. Indie publishing has about the same prestige as having your own blog (Yeah, it’s nice, but anyone can do it.).

If your main goal in publishing is to get that recognition, you don’t need to read further. You want traditional publishing (although I will say # of sales and making the charts on Amazon is starting to be its own stamp of approval, so this may change over time).

Control

Ceding any control over your book can be hard. Scratch that. It can be insanely, drastically impossible (or it can seem that way). Changing your book simply because some editor (and what do they know?) said to? Excuse me?

I understand the emotion; however, I have mixed feelings about choosing self-publishing to get full control over your book. If you’re an experienced writer, and the book is still going through a thorough editing process, then I’m all for it. Sounds great. If you’re a first-time writer, you may or may not be doing yourself (and your book) a disservice.

Assuming that the editor is completely off base and that your book is perfect as it is… well, that’s problematic. While it’s possible, more often than not, the editor is right – if not about how to fix the problems, then at least about the fact that there are problems and what the problems are (alas, no book is perfect).

So getting full control is fine as long as that doesn’t become an excuse for ignoring major problems. Remember: making the book better means it will probably sell better (which means more money for you).

Money

As much as writers are artists, we are also adults who (generally) need to make money to pay for important things (like food, rent, books – you know, the essentials). I’m not enough of an expert to tell you exact price points. What I want to talk about is perspective and strategy.

Are you more concerned with long-term payoff or a fast, guaranteed return?

If you need money to spend now, you’re going to get more upfront from traditional publishing than from indie publishing. With an advance against royalties contract, you get a big fat check upfront followed by royalties after you sell enough (which can take a while). Most of the figures I’ve seen for advances are quoted in the thousands (for more information, here’s “11 Frequently Asked Questions About Book Royalties, Advances and Money” by Chuck Sambuchino), so it can take a while for ebook sales to match that.

For example, to match a $3,000 advance, you’d have to sell between 700 and 8,600 copies of your ebook, depending on how you decide to price it. And that was one of the lower advances I saw.

Can you make more than that? Absolutely. If your book is good (or simply popularly appealing), and you get it out where people can see it, you can definitely sell a lot more than that. And the plus of getting to set your price is that you determine how high your royalties are – and when you compare royalties, ebooks almost always win out. With higher royalties, you definitely have the opportunity to make that much and more in the long-term.

The odds of it happening overnight are not so good.

If you’re confident that you can market to sell, and you don’t need the extra influx of cash, indie publishing could be a bigger payoff in the long-term. If you need some money now, you have a better chance of getting more with traditional publishing.

Time/Energy

The last factor to consider is your time and energy. And I might add knowledge of marketing. Ideally, you’ll be doing some promoting either way; however, the amount is going to change based on whether you have help from a publisher or not.

Do you have the time, energy, and knowledge to do all your own marketing? More importantly, do you have the time, energy, and knowledge to do it well?

People can’t buy your book if they don’t know it’s there. That goes for printed books as well as ebooks. And that’s the point of marketing. The job of marketing is to make people know that the book is there and (we hope) make it sound worth buying. There’s a lot that goes into it – remember that businesses have a person or even a whole team of people whose full-time jobs are doing the marketing for that business.

If you go with indie publishing, you are responsible for your own marketing. Period. End of story. Unless your best friend is a marketing expert who’s willing to put in some hours as a gift, you are on your own. That means that all the time and energy spent researching, making marketing materials, and setting up ads or accounts are all coming from you (and the money that goes into  it does, too).

If you don’t think you can do that, indie publishing might not be the option for you.

With traditional publishing, at least some marketing is included. So while you should do some promotions yourself, you will not be completely on your own. The cover at least will be done for you, and most likely, there will be some deal to get the books printed and in stores. With copies of your books in bookstores, you also have the option of the impulse buy from browsing that is generally harder online.

Traditional Publishing vs. Indie Publishing

Prestige, control, money, time/energy – each of these factors can be huge, and they can vary dramatically from person to person. Or even from moment to moment and book to book. You can use traditional publishing for 1 book and indie publishing for another. People starting their careers might need a very different strategy from someone who’s well established.

So what’s your strategy? How will you sell your book?

The All-Important Manuscript Format

If you’ve been looking at places to submit your work (book publishers, magazines, contests, etc.), you’ve probably noticed that just about all of them use the same term. Even in the modern day of sending files instead of printed pages, pretty much all publishers are looking for manuscript format.

So what is manuscript format?

Instead of trying to explain it myself, I’m going to provide you with a couple links to descriptions by people with a lot more experience in the publishing industry.

  • Proper Manuscript Format” by William Shunn (a published science fiction author) is a great introduction since it not only explains the rules of the format and the reasons for the rules but also is in manuscript format – it is both explanation and example.
  • Shunn has additional (and more traditional) articles on manuscript format, as well. Another that might interest you involves the difference between tabs and indents: “Indenting paragraphs without the tab key.”

If you don’t have time to read through a variety of articles (say, you have a contest deadline tomorrow), here is a shorter version with a straight-forward list of rules:

There you go. Manuscript format in the words of people who work with it all the time. Anyone have anything to add?

The Delicate Art of Book Promotion

Here’s an excellent peek into the life of an author. Whether you’re planning on self-publication, blogging, or going through a publisher, self-promotion is part of making it work. If the books are as well-written as the article, then, they’re definitely worth a glance, too.

Winona Kent

I’ve just spent the better part of five days getting ready for a book release.

Real-Book-07-cillarose-coming soon-smallReal-Book-07-coldplay-coming soon-smallReal-Book-07-POM-coming soon-smallReal-Book-07-skywatcher-coming soon-small

Actually, as you can see, it’s four books, and they’re being re-released. One of them, my debut novel, a tongue-incheek spy story called Skywatcher, has been out of print since 1989.

The others are The Cilla Rose AffairSkywatcher’s sequel, same characters, new adventure – Mission: Impossible meets The Man from UNCLE; Cold Play – a standalone thriller set on a cruise ship in Alaska; and Persistence of Memory, the first in my Memory Books series about accidental time traveller Charlie Duran and her companion Shaun Deeley.

Persistence of Memory, as you may know, was published by Fable Press in 2013. Unfortunately Fable went out of business earlier this year, but the good news is, Diversion Books in New York agreed to republish it, along with my three…

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