10 Fun Made-up Words from Movies, Books, and Musicals

fun made-up words from movies books and musicals

That’s what fun made-up words make you do. Admit it.

Hurray for neologisms! (and neologists!) These fun made-up words from movies, books, and musicals will keep you smiling – especially when you start throwing them around in conversation!

10 Neologisms (Fun Made-up Words)

 1. Thneed

Picking a single neologism from Dr. Seuss books is quite a challenge. His amusing, rhythmic stories rely on fun made-up words more than perhaps any other author’s works (AKA nonsense words). I finally settled on a thneed by deciding that people and places wouldn’t be included in this article (This would be a lot longer list if I included every made-up name of a person, country, or language!).

And like many of Dr. Seuss’ made-up words, “thneed” is fun to say, which is always a plus with neologisms. English just doesn’t combine “th” with “n” very often without using something in between like, I don’t know, a vowel.

Besides, “a thneed is a thing that everyone needs.”

2. Psammead

Ever read Five Children and It by E. Nesbit? If you haven’t, I highly recommend it, especially for kids who enjoy imaginative stories and dryly humorous British narrators (You know what I mean.). This particular story (and several others about the same children) features the Psammead, a sand fairy.

I’ll be honest: I have no idea how to pronounce Psammead. I guess I could watch the movie (AKA cheat and learn someone’s idea of how to pronounce it), but that would take all the fun out of trying!

3. Hooficure

Yes, even the new My Little Ponies has neologisms. This one seems decently self-explanatory. In fact, it makes more sense than a manicure at first glance (that is, until you find out that the Latin root “man” means “hand”).

4. Snicker-snack

You know what it’s from. In fact, you’ve probably listened to celebrities read “The Jabberwocky” recently. Like Dr. Seuss’ work, “The Jabberwocky” is full of fun made-up words. I like this one because it’s not only a neologism – it’s also a fun example of onomatopoeia.

Granted, I have no specific definition for it. But that’s part of the appeal of the poem, isn’t it? And neologisms, too, come to think of it.

5. Foodimals

These creatures from Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 are named from an obvious combination of words. Other than adding an appropriate suffix, it’s one of the oldest techniques of making up new words. It’s also one of the best for getting the point across in a hurry while still using a fun made-up word.

Go ahead, take a wild swing and guess what a foodimal is. Did you guess an animal made out of food? Some sort of food animal? (Really, what else would you guess?) Then, you’ve pretty much got the idea.

6. Pensieve

$10 says you recognize this one!

Not really. I can’t afford to make bets and start a new business at the same time. Still, I would expect that you’ve at least heard this word from J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series. Like many of these authors, Rowling made up quite a few fun words in her books. She also did a lot of word play and re-defining existing words.

Pensieve holds a special place in my heart 1. because I want one (seriously, my mind is kind of turning into a stereotypical wizard’s tower room: so full of randomly interesting stuff that it’s hard to find what you were looking for – whatever the word for that was), and 2. because it’s a pun. And who doesn’t like a good pun? (If you can find one!)

7. Snarfblat

Aren’t you glad we don’t live back in the days when all people had to do was stare at each other? Now, instead, we don’t have to look at each other at all except through little screens! Awesome, am I right?

This little gem from The Little Mermaid is a fun made-up word and definition for a real thing. Which only goes to show how important it is to have a reliable resource when looking for information. In other words, don’t ask a seagull.

8. Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious

I absolutely love that spell check knows how to spell this! There are dotted red lines under half of these words – not this one! Heh. Maybe, I typed loudly enough to sound precocious, so the spellcheck assumed I knew what I was doing.

For those of us who grew up with Mary Poppins as children, this word (and its song) have a special place in our hearts. Those who didn’t probably just rolled their eyes and said, “Don’t expect me to try to say that!”

Well, it is one of the most ambitious of our fun made-up words…

9. Yabba dabba doo!

Is this a fun made-up word or a fun made-up phrase? (Depends on who’s spelling it)

I like to think that this neologism came from animators and screenwriters sitting around and making caveman noises. Either that, or a voice actor getting so caught up in the character that he starts spouting nonsense. (It may be closer to the second one if you believe this article about its origin.)

Wherever it came from, if you know the Flintstones, you know this word!

10. Cowabunga!

Last, but certainly not least, comes the catchphrase of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. I hate to say that it actually came from The Howdy Doody Show and was used in circumstances that would probably be considered offensive today. But if you’re like me and want to pretend you never heard that, hit play, close your eyes, and listen to the Master.

That’s it folks! Until next neologisms (Wouldn’t that make a great holiday?), happy word making!

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One thought on “10 Fun Made-up Words from Movies, Books, and Musicals

  1. Pingback: Why We Don’t Flip Flop Sounds: The Unwritten Rules of English | Words & Deeds

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